Video technology (VAR) in football


#1

:eyes:


#2

Long overdue. Refs struggle too often these days at making correct decisions. The pace of the game has gone up and they’re struggling to get even basic decisions correct at times. This should’ve been introduced to Football yonks ago, but like goal line technology, it’s taken too far too long to get something implemented.

Wonder in the long term whether it be similar to Rugby, where you can make unlimited challenges, or like Tennis/Cricket where you get a limited number of challenge decisions made.


#3

Dislike. The wrong decisions give us something to complain about. Football fans love a good moan. What will we complain about if the referees are making all the right calls?!


#4

:confused: Hope you aren’t serious


#5

[quote=“Phoebica, post:3, topic:1279”]
What will we complain about if the referees are making all the right calls?!
[/quote]Don’t worry, us Arsenal fans will always find something to moan about :wenger:


#6

The idea that fans “love something to complain about” is to my mind, at least as an argument against video technology chiefly a myth propagated by media companies who know iffy decisions mean viewers for analysis, websites sky sports news and most importantly adverts.


#7

fuck yes! So the best officiated game next season will also be the most pointless one! :clap:


#8

No I’m not really serious. It is obviously long overdue. I’m all for it as long as it doesn’t change the game too much. Though I may change my mind if all the decisions go against us.


#9

No thank you. The replay system for all sports here in the states has rendered them unwatchable for me. Maybe if they just have a 5th official reviewing the match up in a booth on tv and they make the calls relatively quickly then it might be ok. However what’s gonna happen is you’ll have every little decision being reviewed and then you’ll have judgement calls like hand balls and red cards being reversed or enforced when it’s basically impossible to judge intent ect. It’s gonna be fucking stupid.


#10

Be nice if they outlined some details other than “two lads will watch some screens”.


#11

Without doubt I think all penalties and red cards should be reviewed. Smaller decisions maybe there should be a limited number of challenges.


#12

I would add goals ruled out for offside should be challenged as well. Cost Southampton badly at the weekend.

I think in order to keep the flow of the game, maybe you could have a system where each team is limited to challenge a decision just twice in a game. So that way you have to think carefully when to use them up, rather than just aimlessly challenging everything and slowing the game down.

It can be up to the captain to then call out a decision during those 90 minutes. Perhaps you could put a tiny little device inside the captains armband and if they want to make a challenge, they can simply press the device in the armband, that then appears on the ref’s stopwatch to alert them and then the incident can be reviewed.


#13

I don’t see why challenges or such nonsense should be necessary. Two lads in a room watching some screens sounds about right to me, have them watching those screens and connected to the earphone of the referee. When he gets an important decision wrong they tell him, and he can reverse it, just like a linesman does. This is the 21st century, it’s really not that complicated, IMO.


#14

I hate the idea of challenges. If there’s a question about a goal, a dubious challenge or whatever the ref should be the one to ask for help. Otherwise what are the boundaries for when a challenege can/can’t be made?

They won’t do that. No sport does that. Unless some silly American sport does.


#15

I’m talking about in real time. The same way an assistant flags and a referee will go over to talk to him before giving the final decision. It’s the exact same. Humanity has achieved much more complicated things than having a man in a booth watching with enhanced perspective (ie, various screens, gunning from italy style) the proceedings and talking into a referee’s earphone to give him advice.


#16

I know what you’re saying. I’m saying it won’t happen. Actually, I’ll go further and say it wouldn’t work (across the board at least). Watching a screen in real time doesn’t let us make any real better informed decisions than a ref does in the moment so let’s say a ref doesn’t give a peno up one end, the game proceeds and the other team go down the field and score. Meanwhile Johnny the TV ref decides it should have been a pen after watching 1/3/5/8? replays butthead balls already in the back of the other teams net…What’s the proposed resolution?


#17

Really shouldn’t take that many replays to decide. But the resolution is clear: the goal at the other end is disallowed, the penalty is given. If it was a penalty the other action wouldn’t’ve happened, so it’s a pretty simple case. Like I said, I don’t see why people want to make the thing so complicated.


#18

Mmm. I look forward to seeing how they implement this. The current system certainly needs improvement, and the goal line technology has been invaluable. I’m worried that anything further will unnecessarily slow the game down.


#19

[quote=“AbouCuellar, post:17, topic:1279”]
If it was a penalty the other action wouldn’t’ve happened, so it’s a pretty simple case.
[/quote]But if the referee hasn’t decided to call halt to play and the other team goes and scores, you can’t go disallow it either. Then you’ve got a bigger problem than first created.


#20

Yes you can. And have you? Again, that action never happens if there is a penalty, so any sour grapes the team that just goes down the pitch and scored has got are just that. It’s like the Napoli-Juve action the other day, if it was a penalty on Albiol it’s a penalty on Albiol, and the penalty down the other end on Cuadrado never happens. Juve might complain but no more than Napoli ended up complaining anyways. Either way, the question is getting it right, not who is going to be indignant or complaining.

Finally, I really doubt it should take long enough for a player to go down and score for that communication to happen. The Juve-Napoli action is a paradigm case of a team going down from one end to the other after a penalty shout about as fast as you can, and even there 10 seconds have elapsed. Again, in a world where military technology is making much bigger decisions in much more compressed time frames, this really isn’t as complicated as people are making it out. Just because football tends to be run by dullards doesn’t mean it has to be that way.