Work/life balance


#61

It’s ironic because all I ever heard back in school was, ‘how useless is maths I’ll never need to do differentiation and integration in real life’ :arteta:


#62

I used to think the same. ‘I like it and it’s fun & all but where the heck am I gonna apply this.’
Now the whole ML/AI industry has come up & works mostly on Mathematics.


#63

Like Pythagoras and SOHCAHTOA isn’t really where the money is.

It’s the crazy fucking calculus that it’s all about


#64

Yeah, regret choosing English over Maths at university. I love Maths and was pretty good at it.

I’m committed to a career change. I will finish my current job next month regardless if I have something lined up for Jan. I’m going to enjoy 2 weeks off for Christmas and New Years, although I’ll spend part of it doing a self-study.

I’m currently working my way through the Harvardx CS50 course on Edx, Intro to Computer Science. Enjoying it so far. Once I’m finished I’m going to focus on Python and go from there. If I continue to enjoy it, then I’ll complete a project or two on my own or try to get onto a Bootcamp course to make the transition into software developer. It’s still a career you can get into without a relevant degree if you put the work in to both learn and create projects. Good money and plenty of jobs with good hours.


#65

Check out MIT opencourses for Mathematics & Computer science.
I am currently learning Python with Datacamp which I would recommend but plenty of great courses out there which are not paid ones.


#66

Wasn’t @Naweed involved in this area as well? One of the reasons we don’t see him around on OA anymore.

Choosing a career and deciding on what direction to go in, is so damn hard. Respect to anyone who’ve managed to find a job in something they’re passionate about. I very much agree with the work’life balance regards to you got to make time for yourself. People can choose to work whatever hours they’re comfortable with I guess, but 40 hours plus just doesn’t seem worth while unless you’re in a particular job you geniunely enjoy doing.

Too many get burnt out from overworking and it shouldn’t have to be that way.


#67

I’m here - My lack of activity is just because i’m lazy…

I’m 28, graduated at 22. By the time I was 22 I already had two internships under my belt, one at a tier 1 bank (UBS) and another at a tier 1 Re-insurer (Swiss Re). In my opinion, the current generation are spoon fed too much and are honestly so bland as personalities.

Most of my employment history are largely Investment Banks - started off in Operations (which wasn’t for me, found it dull, but there were interesting aspects - gave me a lot of insight) and now i’m in Risk and absolutely love what I do. It’s what I went University for. There were times where I just didn’t like work, that was predominantly due to the institution and people there not so much the work.

I’ve worked for people who were just clueless and came to work for the pay packet…And it’s quite telling too. Whilst it’s good for them (getting money to do jack shit), it isn’t good for someone to nurture their career.

My favourite employers were Nomura and currently Bank of America. Personally, I find it very, very, very important to be surrounded by knowledgeable and experienced individuals. Not only to learn from, but to gain perspective. I earn a pretty good salary I think - between £70 to £80k + bonus (won’t give specifics because of company policy etc. In hindsight, I should ask for more and probably will when/if I move on). I work hard to ensure I get remunerated well - and this year i’ve focused on getting promoted. That in itself would mean working harder. However, working harder doesn’t mean working longer. It is honestly that saying, “work smarter”. I make good connections in my institution and let people know who I am. It lets me get the job done and to a very high standard.

Generally, when I was at Nomura and now at Bank of America, I get in for 9.30-ish (go to gym for 8, have my session then go to my desk). Get my work done and leave anywhere between 5.30 to 6.30. I don’t mind those hours because I enjoy what I do. That is very important. I also don’t mind working till 10pm on the very rare occasians due to work commitments. Because it’s so rare, it’s quite enjoyable because you get to see another side of your colleagues and you really dig in deep together.

Generally in Banking, if you’re front office (those who generate revenues) you work much longer hours but you do get paid VERY well. However, some front office areas are better than others when you factor in your hourly wage etc. Generally traders don’t work excessive hours (unless their bespoke trading desks) they get in hour before the market opens and usually leave an hour after - i’ve seen that everywhere I go. Those who work in “IBD” (Investment Banking Division) have to pitch sales etc. to prospective clients so the hours are absolutely ridiculous. Most of those I know in IBD grind it out for 5 years, take a year or so out, then go work in another-more-relaxed function of the Bank.

I noticed someone is also learning Python here. That is a very great programming language to learn. I’m learning it because it’s where my industry is right now. Extreme automation. I have great ideas, and i’ll get recognised more if I can do what’s in my mind and bring it to fruition through Python.

I’m using udemy to learn Python. I think the course costs like £10 and it seems to be pretty damn good so far. In addition to that, since most of my work has a lot of Python I will have at-hand-experience in testing code etc.

My post seems a bit scrambled but whatever. Whenever i’ve gone into a job interview, I list my demands straight up. i don’t care who is interviewing to be honest. I tell everyone I meet that i’m a passionate guy, I wear my heart on my sleeve. if I don;t like something, i’ll say it and back it up. If it’s something I can fix with my own two hands, i’ll do it. I also get to work from home once a week too and generally my boss(es) are fine with that.

Banking as a whole has changed massively. You wouldn’t consider working from home like 10 years ago. But you’re finding that people are literally choosing work-life-balance over pay-packets. Hence, why Banks (apart from the revenue generating functions) are willing to accommodate their employees.

Oh and for those wanting to get into Banking, there are schemes that are becoming popular catered toward people who want a change in career or who have been out of work for a considerable amount of time.

I’m also married now, and my wife is a primary school teacher. She works harder than I do and earns probably half as much. She is getting tired of it, but I think she enjoys teaching young kids and seeing them develop. To her, that means a lot. To me, I couldn’t care. i try and support her career. The only downside is that I have to go on holidays during peak times and its fucking expensive and bullshit.